The Maplewood Club History

Club History I - The Beginning           

In 1966 as a part of a 50th Anniversary book, Henry Niemitz, Bob Bird and Lacy Seabrook wrote a comprehensive Club history.  In 1996 Charlie Bibbins updated this history for the Spirit drawing heavily on the earlier information.    ...and other sports and diversions, and to promote sociability and good fellowship among the members of the community and to furnish them with club facilities."

 

The certificate of incorporation was filed with the NJ Secretary of State on February 10, 1916.  On February 28 the incorporators met for the first time to vote $8000 to build a clubhouse at the corner of Claremont Avenue and Ridgewood Road.  Membership was set at 125.  On February 29 The Tennis Club purchased much of the current property from Budal Realty Co.

A month later the incorporators held their first meeting as trustees and elected Samuel Baldwin the first president.  Among other things they voted to secure a loan for $8000 to grade the property, build a clubhouse, purchase a set of bowling alleys and change the name of the club to "The Maplewood Club".  [Note that it was not until 1922 that South Orange Township was renamed Maplewood.]  In May, 37 members of the Club held the first annual spring meeting and approved all of the foregoing proposals plus a Constitution and By-Laws.  The latter, in addition to the usual provisions, prohibited "liquor or alcoholic beverages of any kind" and prohibited entertainment or activities in the clubhouse on Sunday.  A motion to also prohibit tennis on Sunday lost by one vote.  By December 1916 the clubhouse had been completed.

4 tennis courts were authorized in 1916 and 2 were surfaced the next year. A 3rd court was surfaced in 1936.  These were all red clay courts.  In the 1940's the court 4 area was used for childrens' activities and included a swing, trapeze and seesaw and space for croquet and badminton.  Court 4 was finally surfaced in 1957.  Drainage problems plagued the clay surface resulting in a loss of 2-3 days in playing time whenever it rained. Therefore in 1979 the clay was replaced with Har-Tru.

In 1920 a second pair of bowling alleys were built at the same time that the west end of the clubhouse was extended.  In 1965 the alleys were fully rebuilt, new lighting and paneling were installed and the hand-set pins were replaced with automatic pinsetters.

In the early 1960's plans were developed to build a Club swimming pool.  A large number of new "pool members" were added each of whom paid a $200 deposit.  The hole was dug in 1963, but a court suit ensued which led to a December 1964 NJ Supreme Court ruling that the pool could be built only if we received approval from the town zoning board since this was a non-conforming use.  We scrapped the proposal.  The end result was not all bad.  While the Club returned all deposits, most of the new people chose to join the Club, and the membership increased significantly.  [Note that the Maplewood municipal pool opened in 1966.]

 

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The following article appeared on the front page of the March 10, 1916 Home News of Millburn, Maplewood and South Orange, the weekly predecessor to the News Record.

NEW  CLUB  FORMING  IN  MAPLEWOOD

 

It is well known in certain social circles in Maplewood that public announcements will soon be made concerning a new club recently organized. The property facing on both Ridgewood road and Claremont avenue has already been purchased.  The membership of the club will be limited to 125, and in order to become a member candidates must be proposed by a member and each member must subscribe for one share of stock valued at $100.  The yearly dues will be $30.  Plans are now being made by the architect for a clubhouse, and the grounds will be laid out for the present to provide tennis courts for the members.  We are told that there is no intention to oppose the Maplewood Field Club [now known as the Maplewood Country Club] which has a large membership, but that the new club is being organized principally to provide a place in town where the ladies can entertain a party of friends at teas or receptions which they cannot do at the Field Club owing to the lack of proper facilities.

It is said the new club is practically a community affair to provide conveniences which the Field Club does not afford its members.

We are not at liberty at  this time to publish the names of the members in the new club, but will be prepared to furnish this information at an early date.  We can say, however, that the new club will number among the membership the most elite in Maplewood society.

 

MAPLEWOOD  CLUB  PROPERTY

In 1911 all of the property in sections A, B, F and G on the map below were owned by G. E. Menzel.  The lands west of the Club (on both sides of what is now Hemlock Court) were owned by William E Bird Jr., an early Club member. Sections C, D and E extending all the way up to Wyoming Avenue were owned by Carrie Hatch.

January 1916   The Tennis Club purchased sections A and B from Budal  Realty for $1000 or $7000 [the deed is unclear].  A was a 40' strip from Claremont to the property and was the only access for the Club.  [In 1963 when the hole for the swimming pool was dug it was rediscovered that all of our waterlines go through this right-of-way to Claremont Avenue.]

 

At the same time Edwin Hatch, a charter Club member, bought sections C, D and E from Budal, and gave the Club an option to buy them. [We do not know the relationship between Edwin Hatch and Carrie Hatch who owned this property 5 years earlier or when Budal bought it.]

March 1916   The Club conveyed a 6' strip of land within section A to Warren Denton of 13 Claremont, a charter member, to allow him access to the street.  This house was subsequently renumbered 11 and was later owned by Club members the Martis, Butterlys, Steiners and Weinbergers.

May 1916    The Tennis Club changed its name to the Maplewood Club.

December 1916 The clubhouse was completed.

February 1917    The Maplewood Club bought a 40' strip of land (C) from Edwin Hatch and built its driveway.

October 1917 The Maplewood Club began negotiations with Edwin Hatch's bankruptcy trustee* to buy section D to use as a parking lot.  This sale was completed in April 1918 for $1700.

*  In 1916 Hatch was VP of Mutual Trust Co of NYC and Samuel Baldwin (the first MC president) was President.  By 1918 Baldwin was unemployed and Hatch was in bankruptcy and had moved.

May 1918    The Maplewood Club reached agreement with Club member Harry Brophy of 487 Ridgewood Rd (now Trish Johnston's home) for him to use the MC driveway as rear access for an annual fee of $1.00.  A similar agreement was reached with the owner of 491 Ridgewood.  A few years later a lot of Trustees' discussions centered on the fact that Brophy was not making his payments.

October 1927 The Maplewood Club leased a 25' strip of land to J Monroe Graham of 11 Claremont and Alfred Nowakowski of 15 Claremont @ $150/year for 10 years plus for another $1/year for the rights to use our access to Claremont. Sometime later (we are not sure when) a 19' strip within A was sold to the owners of #9 Claremont and another 15' to #11.  A 2' right-of-way was retained to provide a permanent access by foot from Claremont to the Club.

In 1996 under President Jim Lengeling's leadership the Club undertook a $140,000 renovation project precipated by the pending collapse of the railroad ties above and below the courts.  The steep, ivy covered slopes above the courts were replaced by the current terraces backed up by KeyStone retaining walls which were also erected as retaining walls below the courts.

The viewing area was relocated, drainage was substantially improved and considerable landscaping was added.  Pat McGovern played a major role in the design of the changes and overseeing the contractor.

 

In 1999 air conditioning was installed in the clubhouse making it much more usable for summer activities.

Our block has an interesting history.  The house at 491 Ridgewood Road next to our driveway was built in 1767.  One early owner, William Ross, had a blacksmith shop on what is now our driveway.  The house was bought in 1803 by Caleb Durand, cousin of the noted Maplewood-born painter Asher B. Durand. The Durand family owned the house until 1879.

In 1811 Caleb Durand sold a piece of his property bordering on Bear Lane (now Claremont Avenue) and Grub Street (now Ridgewood Road) to the trustees of the Jefferson Village Baptist Church.  This area roughly coincided with the first 4 lots up Claremont now on the Club side.  A small chapel wasbuilt on the corner which soon became known as the Babel Chapel.  The chapel was sold in 1858 to the Jefferson Village Methodist-Episcopal Church which subsequently moved it to the current Morrow Memorial M-E Church site.  A plot of land behind the original chapel was used for a cemetery which ultimately included at least 15 Revolutionary War soldiers.

 

Club History II - Property         

Our club has an interesting history. The house next to our driveway was built in 1767. There was a chapel on Claremont Avenue and in 1963 a hole was dig for a swimming pool.                 Sections C, D and E extending all the way up to Wyoming Avenue were owned by Carrie Hatch

 

 

January 1916:  The Tennis Club purchased sections A and B from Budal Realty for $1000 or $7000 (the deed is unclear). A was a 40' strip from Claremont to the property and was the only access for the Club. [In 1963 when the hole for the swimming pool was dug it was rediscovered that all of our waterlines go through this right-of-way to Claremont Avenue.) At the same time Edwin Hatch, a charter Club member, bought sections C, D and E from Budal, and gave the club an option to buy them. (We do not know the relationship between Edwin Hatch and Carrie Hatch who owned this property 5 years earlier or when Budal bought it.)

March 1916: The Club conveyed a 6' strip of land within section A to Warren Denton of 13 Claremont, a charter member, to allow him access to the street. This house was subsequently renumbered 11 and was later owned by Club members the Martis, Butterlys, Steiners and Weinbergers.

May 1916: The Tennis Club changed its name to the Maplewood Club.

December 1916: The clubhouse was completed.

October 1917: The MC began negotiations with Edwin Hatch's bankruptcy trustee* to buy section D to use as a parking lot. This sale was completed in April 1918 for $1700.

 

In 1916 Hatch was VP f Mutual Trust Co of NYC and Samuel Baldwin (the first MC President) was President. By 1918 Baldwin was unemployed and Hatch was in bankruptcy and had moved.

May 1918: The MC reached agreement with Club member Harry Brophy of 487 Ridgewood Rd (now Trish Johnston's home) for him to use the MC driveway as rear access for an annual fee of $1.00. A similar agreement was reached with the owner of 491 Ridgewood. A few years later a lot of Trustees' discussions centered on the fact that Brophy was not making his payments.

October 1927: The MC leased a 25' strip of land to J Monroe Graham of 11 Claremont and Alfred Nowakowski of 15 Claremont @ $150/year for 10 years plus for another $1/year for the rights to use our access to Claremont. Sometime later (we are not sure when) a 19' strip within A was sold to the owners of #9 Claremont and another 15' to #11. A 2' right-of-way was retained to provide a permanent access by foot from Claremont to the Club.

In 1996 under President Jim Lengeling's leadership the Club undertook a $140,000 renovation project precipated by the pending collapse of the railroad ties above and below the courts. The steep, ivy covered slopes above the courts were replaced by the current terraces backed up by KeyStone retaining walls which were also erected as retaining walls below the courts.

The viewing area was relocated, drainage was substantially improved and considerable landscaping was added. Pat McGovern played a major role in the design of the changes and overseeing the contractor.

In 1999 air conditioning was installed in the clubhouse making it much more usable for summer activities.

Our block has an interesting history. The house at 491 Ridgewood Road next to our driveway was built in 1767. One early owner, William Ross, had a blacksmith shop on what is now our driveway. The house was bought in 1803 by Caleb Durand, cousin of the noted Maplewood-born painter Asher B. Durand. The Durand family owned the house until 1879.

In 1811 Caleb Durand sold a piece of his property bordering on Bear Lane (now Claremont Avenue) and Grub Street (now Ridgewood Road) to the trustees of the Jefferson Village Baptist Church. This area roughly coincided with the first 4 lots up Claremont now on the Club side. A small chapel was built on the corner which soon became known as the Babel Chapel. The chapel was sold in 1858 to the Jefferson Village Methodist-Episcopal Church which subsequently moved it to the current Morrow Memorial M-E Church site. A plot of land behind the original chapel was used for a cemetery which ultimately included at least 15 Revolutionary War soldiers.

 

Club History III - Membership           

During the Depression and World War II, the number of members plummeted to 42 and the club was nearly closed. Today the membership is 310.   The accompanying by-laws allowed for up to 125 members (which was raised to 150 in 1961). There has been no other membership restriction in the history of the Club.

 

 

Despite this by-law, Mrs. Grace Kilburn was accepted as a full member in 1917, and was an active participant for a couple of years. We can find no other such exception although, according to the 50th Anniversary book, in the late 30's Mickey (Mrs. Max) Clason served a term as Trustee. Mickey had been head of the Women's Committee which had played a major role in the Club since its inception. In 1917 the Ladies' Committee presented a clock to the Club. More recently, the Women’s Committee contributed our piano as a result of a rummage sale they ran. They scheduled a very active social program for many years including a series of afternoon bridges often with accompanying activities such as fashion shows, and a Sunday afternoon tea dance that was a long time tradition.

By April 1917, the membership had grown to 95 and four years later was 121. Then a diminishing interest in tennis led to a drop to 83 by fall 1923. It remained at about this level until 1930 but then plunged to 41 by October 1931 and to 32 in February 1933. In 1935 it was back to 65 but then again dropped to 41 in 1938 and remained low through WW II. Around 1949 the Trustees contemplated closing the Club, but deferred this to test a suggestion by John Apetz to create a Tennis Membership where people could play for a lesser charge but have no clubhouse privileges. This was successful, and the membership grew steadily to 87 in 1953, 93 in 1961 and 149 in 1963 as a result of the pool effort.

In 1975 President Ted Northrup appointed a by-laws review committee with the understanding that the restrictive membership clause with respect to women be re-evaluated. At the next annual meeting (1976) the members approved the committee's proposal to eliminate any barrier to women being members or trustees. The membership limit was then doubled to 300. No one resigned in protest. At that same meeting Med Ripley became the first woman member to be elected a trustee. In 1982 Jana Maher was voted the first woman president. The by-laws were subsequently changed to allow the Club to accept up to ten additional members "in anticipation of resignations" so in effect the current limit is 310.

Club History IV - Presidents                

1916 Samuel W Baldwin

1916-1918 Charles J Van Gunten

1918-1919 J G Trusdell-Moore

1919-1920 J Monroe Graham

1920-1922 Richard D Whitton

1922-1924 Eugene C Estep

1924-1925 George W Otis

1925-1926 Samuel G Memory

1926-1927 Douglas Swift

1927-1929 Roland H Zinn

1929-1930 Lawrence E Falls

1930-1932 Alexander E Bauhan

1932-1933 Jeptha A Wade

1933-1935 John S Wright

1935-1936 Harlan S DeVoe

1936-1939 Guy D Potter

1939-1940 Max O Clason

1940-1942 Ernest A Cain

1942-1944 Frank Timson

1944-1946 Howard Reed

1946-1948 John F McKenna

1948-1951 Arthur H Bolton

1951-1953 J Lawrence Boyd

1953-1955 Gordon D MacCoy

1955-1956 Frank R Carmines

1956-1958 Clifford N Wells

1958-1960 William M Gaston

1960-1962 Warren K Rodat

1962-1964 Leonard B Faupel

1964-1966 Donald K Schweikert

1966-1968 Charles E "Ted" Villanueva

1968-1969 Edward J Lynott Jr

1969-1971 Harold T Sasso

1971-1972 Gerald L Turley

1972-1973 Kenneth R Dawe

1973-1974 Fred McClintock

1974-1975 Charles L Johnson Jr

1975-1977 Theodore D Northrup

1977-1979 Robert W Liptak

1979-1981 Donald B Knox

1981-1982 Peter W Rupprecht

1982-1984 Jana Maher

1984-1986 Roger Hill

1986-1988 Robert J Bolderman

1988-1990 Michael Keeler

1990-1992 Penny V Dinger

1992-1994 Charles L Koch

1994-1997 James V Lengeling

1997-1999 Chris Amundsen

1999-2002 Jay Eisenberg

2002-2004       Jon Clark

2004 – 2006 -

2006 – 2008 – Pablo Chamorro

2008 – 2010 Mike Paradis

2010 – 2012 Kai Moi

2012 – 2014 Lisa Rott

2014 – 2016 Andrew Haines

Since a prime reason for the founding of the Club was the playing of tennis, the original Trustees wasted no time in providing the means to play. The Board’s first meeting on March 20, 1916 authorized the building of courts, and the House and Grounds Committee moved quickly to contract for the laying out of four courts and the surfacing of two of them. By June 1917 the Club could invite the Orange Lawn Tennis Club, Maplewood Field Club, Madison Golf Club, Short Hills Club and Chatham Fish and Game Club to participate in a ladies' singles tennis tournament for the benefit of the American Red Cross.

In 1919 the first men's singles and doubles tournaments were held with Paul Jackson winning the singles and teaming with F. J. Parsons to win the doubles. Yet by 1921 the tennis chairman reported - 4 - that tennis usage was down because many members were taking up golf instead and many others "were arriving at the corpulent age so do not enjoy tennis". By 1925 so few members were playing that the fall tournaments were cancelled.

By 1927 the Club felt it necessary to offer summer tennis memberships with no social privileges for $10 each. In the spring of 1931 using the $200 authorized by the Trustees the previous year the Club resurfaced the No. 1 and No. 2 courts, repaired the courts' fencing and did some preparatory work on the No 3 and No 4 courts.

Finally in 1936 when membership reached 67 Court 3 was resurfaced and brought to playing shape for the first time. Two years later membership had dropped to 41 and only two courts were in proper playing condition. As a result the Trustees that year authorized issuance of limited tennis memberships at $15 a year. The success of this effort was as limited initially as were the memberships offered ? in May 1939 there were 21 regular and 2 limited tennis members, and a year later there were 25 regular and 5 limited tennis members.

Nevertheless, this number was an improvement sufficient to allow the renovation of Court 3 and the leveling and resurfacing of No's 1 and 2. That same year the Club staged year-end tournaments in men's singles, men's doubles and mixed doubles, the first such competitions in some time. In 1940 an outdoor breakfast was held on the terrace on Memorial Day celebrating the end of the bowling season and the beginning of the tennis season. The first member-guest tournament was held in 1942.

In 1943 the Club's youngest set got a hand when a croquet set, see-saw, swing and trapeze were set up on the grass that grew on Court 4. The following year the level of tennis activity was reflected in the lists of 24 family and 14 individual memberships, and in 1945 a large new bulletin board was installed to publicize tennis events. Year-end tournaments then became a tradition.

Club History V - Courts  

Despite a dearth of members leading into World War II, it was then that court 3 was created. Court 4 remained a grassy area for children to play.     The Board's first meeting on March 20, 1916 authorized the building of courts, and the House and Grounds Committee moved quickly to contract for the laying out of four courts and the surfacing of two of them. By June 1917 the Club could invite the Orange Lawn Tennis Club, Maplewood Field Club, Madison Golf Club, Short Hills Club and Chatham Fish and Game Club to participate in a ladies' singles tennis tournament for the benefit of the American Red Cross.

In 1919 the first men's singles and doubles tournaments were held with Paul Jackson winning the singles and teaming with F. J. Parsons to win the doubles. Yet by 1921 the tennis chairman reported that tennis usage was down because many members were taking up golf instead and many others "were arriving at the corpulent age so do not enjoy tennis". By 1925 so few members were playing that the fall tournaments were cancelled.

By 1927 the Club felt it necessary to offer summer tennis memberships with no social privileges for $10 each. In the spring of 1931 using the $200 authorized by the Trustees the previous year the Club resurfaced the No. 1 and No. 2 courts, repaired the courts' fencing and did some preparatory work on the No 3 and No 4 courts.

Finally in 1936 when membership reached 67, Court 3 was resurfaced and brought to playing shape for the first time. Two years later membership had dropped to 41 and only two courts were in proper playing condition. As a result the Trustees that year authorized issuance of limited tennis memberships at $15 a year. The success of this effort was as limited initially as were the memberships offered. In May 1939 there were 21 regular and 2 limited tennis members, and a year later there were 25 regular and 5 limited tennis members.

Nevertheless, this number was an improvement sufficient to allow the renovation of Court 3 and the leveling and resurfacing of No's 1 and 2. That same year the Club staged year-end tournaments in men's singles, men's doubles and mixed doubles, the first such competitions in some time. In 1940 an outdoor breakfast was held on the terrace on Memorial Day celebrating the end of the bowling season and the beginning of the tennis season. The first member-guest tournament was held in 1942.

In 1943 the Club's youngest set got a hand when a croquet set, see-saw, swing and trapeze were set up on the grass that grew on Court 4. The following year the level of tennis activity was reflected in the lists of 24 family and 14 individual memberships, and in 1945 a large new bulletin board was installed to publicize tennis events. Year-end tournaments then became a tradition.

Club History VI - Tournaments                      

In the early 50's houses were built on Hemlock Court above the Club. As a result water began flowing through our property, and a frequent waterfall turned the Court 4 area into a quagmire. To counterbalance this, a deep U-shaped ditch was dug along the area above the court then west toward Hemlock and back just below the clubhouse starting and ending at the driveway. This was filled in with stones to help filter the water. The area of Court 4 near the fence was dug out by members to a depth of 2' to create a drywell and was filled in with stones.

The first of several Billy Talbert Days was held in 1956 and featured exhibitions by Davis Cup players. Interest in the game, as evidenced by the membership growth, led the Trustees to finally put Court 4 in playing condition. The next year Talbert played Don Budge in an exciting exhibition.

The Married Doubles Tournament began in 1957. Two years later the limited tennis memberships were discontinued, and tennis dues were set at $32. In 1962 the Trustees purchased a silver bowl to list the men's singles winner - the first name listed was Bill Winslow. Three years later a comparable bowl was donated for the women's singles winner with Joan Perrine being the first.

Henry Fagan reigned as Men's Singles champion for 12 years from 1965-1976. When the Men's Masters was introduced in 1986, Henry was its initial winner. The same year Mary Lynott Bolderman won the initial women's Masters title. At first the Masters were for those over 40, but this was changed a few years later to members over 50.

We can find just a few members who won 3 or more titles in one year's fall tournaments: Joan Perrine 1964, Harriet Stokes 1972, Lenore Antinozzi 1979, Chuck Faig 1988, Janet Faig 1993, Jim O'Brien 1995 and Sandy French 1999 each won 3 while Sandy French in 1997 and Mike Shannon in 1998 each won 4 titles.

 

In 1949 Bruce Galbraith, a Seton Hall student was hired as "Court Attendant/Tennis Instructor". He and a fellow student split the next season. Over the subsequent dozen years we had an outside instructor for only one or two years. However, several of the women in the Club, especially Jane Gruning, gave lessons to the juniors. In 1964 Sam Shapiro began the first of 3 stints as tennis pro covering 8 seasons ending in 1985. Bill Winslow, a past Club men's champion, served as tennis instructor from 1974-79. Janet Bates (Faig) was our only lead female tennis pro (1983-4). Lew Wolfe joined us in 1988 and served until 1999. He was followed by John Trinity and, since 2001, by Lou Castelli.

In many years in the 60's the courts were flooded in the winter for ice skating. In 1917 lights were installed on two courts for night play. They were not used for too many years because the idea was proposed again in 1933 but not acted on.

Club History VIII – Bowling

Bowling proved so popular that in 1920 an addition was built on the west side of the clubhouse that contained two more alleys in the basement and the side room on the main floor that includes the current bar.

 

Tennis interest waned in the 20's, but bowling, billiards and pool remained very popular. Automatic pinsetters were installed at some point, but they had so many problems that they were removed in 1929. The alleys were then dependent on pin-boys (and pin-ladies?) until 1965 when used Brunswick automatic pinsetters were again installed. At that time the alleys were rebuilt and new lighting and paneling were put in. Interest was strong until the late 80's when it waned in part because of increasing mechanical problems with the pinsetters. These were retrofitted in 1993 but bowling never caught on again and in 2001 the bowling area was converted into storage and office space.

As an indication of the level of activity at the peak, in 1968 there were 2 men's, 3 women's, a mixed and a children's league. In the 70's there was a regular Friday night couples bowling program and a second children's league ? one for teens and one for "juniors" plus frequent special events e.g., father/child and candlelight bowling. Books of 10 discounted bowling tickets sold steadily, and the alleys were the scene of many family functions on weekends during the tennis "off-season".

During this period Bob Bird, Dick Stox and Chuck Koch usually vied for the high average. However, Don Baxter set the Club record for a single game with a 279 which was subsequently shattered by Chuck Koch's awesome 288. For many years Med Ripley was the leading woman bowler and a cup was donated in her memory by Mary Lynott Bolderman for a member each year that had made significant contributions to bowling.

 

Club History IX - Swimming Pool       

A Swimming Pool Committee then developed a plan for a main pool, a wading pool and a bath house for a total cost of $60,000. In October 1960 the membership approved the plan 49 to 27 with 7 abstentions.

 

The Committee was authorized to proceed and to seek new pool members. The by-laws were changed to allow up to 150 regular members and 100 pool-only members with a $200 bond to be sold to each family wishing to use the pool. By March 1962 both memberships were full and a hole was dug for the main pool. The Club believed that a zoning variance was not required nor a public hearing held, but a lawsuit was filed by several neighbors. The Club was upheld in a lower court, but in December 1964 the NJ Supreme Court ruled that a variance from the zoning board for such an expansion of a non-conforming use was required. The Club then dropped the effort, filled in the hole and returned the bond money, but most of the new people who had been interested proceeded to join the Club as regular members. (Two years later the township opened its community pool.)

Club History X - The Final Chapter

The Club has had stewards from the beginning. In the early years the turnover was very heavy. In 1919 the steward was authorized to serve Club suppers on Thursday evenings not to exceed 25 cents a person, and he could keep the profits. These Thursday suppers proved to be very popular for several years, but there is no indication that the stewards found this to be sufficiently profitable to induce them to stay. These suppers were still being served into the early 60's, although by then the price had risen to $2.00 each. During the early 50's the stewardess often prepared Sunday dinners for a group of members.

 

The longest tenure of Stewards include:

  • Mr. and Mrs. Gus Fuerth 1940-1955 - although Gus died in 1953

  • Adelbert (Albert) and Maria Mayer 1956-1962

  • Alfred and Ellie Vollprecht 1970-1978 - we let Alfred bowl in a men's league since he fixed the pinsetters whenever they malfunctioned

  • Jim and Cynthia Hughes 1986-1990 - Cynthia's parents, John and Bea Tolentino, were Stewards the previous year, but John died so Cynthia took over and then married Jim in the clubhouse in 1987

  • Yakovy and Lusy Shvarts 1993-99 - both were Russian immigrants where Yakov had been an army officer and Lusy a dentist.

  • Andrew and Ginea Koszyk 1999-2002

 

MISCELLANEOUS

The Club newsletter in 1939 was called The Sweeper. The first edition of The Spirit was in September 1948.

 

The Club directory began listing Club champions in tennis, bowling and duplicate bridge (as long as it lasted) in 1965.

 

The President's Cup was contributed in Novermber 1980 by Mary Lynott Bolderman in memory of Ed Lynott.

 

At the 80th Anniversary celebration in 1996 Mary Lynott Bolderman was recognized for her extended contributions to the Club and for best representing our heart and spirit.

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© 2019 The Maplewood Club, 489 Ridgewood Road, Maplewood, New Jersey  07040